Generations For Peace Institute Forum

Generations for Peace Institute logo and Institute forum logo side by side

Intro

The first-ever Generations For Peace Institute Forum was held on 28 and 29 November 2014 in GFP’s Conference Centre in Amman.
The Forum gathered 31 discussants: GFP volunteers-practitioners, the volunteers-representatives of GFP locally registered associations and satellite offices, representatives of GFP’s local partner organisations, and a small number of researchers from the University of Oxford who had previously conducted research for Generations For Peace Institute.
Being a pilot event, the Forum 2014 focused on successes and challenges of Sport For Peace in general, and the Sport For Peace model as applied by Generations For Peace in particular. In total, eight moderated panel discussions tackled a variety of subjects within the main theme, with both panellists and moderators providing a wide range of perspectives and sharing their personal experiences of peace building.
In addition to the participants in Amman, each panel included a number of panellists who have provided their contribution in real-time engaged through social media platforms. Further helping the social media engagement, a series of virtual “Meet-Ups” was organised in a few selected countries during which the GFP volunteers have met in a single location, connected through social media, and engaged in exchange of experiences with moderators and panellists in Amman and those contributing online. Their questions were put up at the end of each panel discussion for responses provided by either panellists or audience present in Amman.
The GFP HQ social media team supported the Forum by helping channel all communications and respond to the comments being submitted online. They were supported in that effort by a special “Volunteer Social Media Team” composed of GFP volunteers from seven countries, who not only provided support in English but also in all local languages engaging to GFP Facebook Country Pages and Twitter.

Agenda

Check the full GFPI Forum Agenda here

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Panel 1 | Does Sport Really Help Build Peace?

The United Nations Inter-Agency Taskforce on Sport for Development and Peace (2003) defines sport as “all forms of physical activity that contribute to physical fitness, mental well-being and social interaction. These include: play; recreation; organised, casual or competitive sport; and indigenous sports or games.” Acknowledging that sport is competitive and cooperative, international and indigenous, and promotes mental and physical health, the question at the centre of this panel discussion was, is sport a useful approach to peace building? And more specifically, what are the specific advantages and disadvantages to such a medium?

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Moderator Mark Clark

Mark Clark

Panellists

Panellist Lama Hattab

Lama Hattab

Panellists

Panellist Paul Wel

Paul Wel

Panellists

Panellist Zahid Johnson

Zahid Johnson

Panellists

Panellist Mercia Takavarasha

Mercia Takavarasha



Panel 2 | Sport For Peace in Practice: GFP Model

Sport For Peace is one of the vehicles for peace building that Generations For Peace (GFP) uses to harness the unique power of sport, to act as an entry point for bringing about change in local communities. To date, Sport For Peace has formed the backbone of most GFP activities across Asia, Europe and Africa. For GFP, Sport For Peace involves the use of carefully facilitated sport and sport-based games, mostly for children and youth,integrating peace-building education for conflict transformation objectives. In this panel, GFP’s specific approach of using sport as a medium to achieve positive change in communities was highlighted. The panellists, three GFP Pioneers who have had first hand experience with GFP’s Sport For Peace model, shared their experiences with particular reference to how the model was adapted to suit their contexts.

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Moderator Judy Kent

Judy Kent

Panellists

Panellist Sanja Angelovska

Sanja Angelovska

Panellists

Panellist Abdullahi Benaiah

Abdullahi Benaiah

Panellists

Panellist Jean-Paul Mana

Jean-Paul Mana

Panellists



Panel 3 | Working with Different Target Groups: Successes and Challenges

Locally-driven peace building takes many forms, varying in terms of what different programmes seek to achieve, how these programmes are implemented in practice and who these programmes work with. Communitybased peace-building and conflict transformation efforts are in fact remarkable in their diversity. What unifies these different types of programmes? What lessons can be learned from community-based initiatives in different parts of the world?

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Moderator Safiya Ibn Garba

Safiya Ibn Garba

Panellists

Panellist Bashar Shweiki

Bashar Shweiki

Panellists

Panellist Fauzia Nayaon

Fauzia Nayaon

Panellists

Panellist Zhanyl Baigabylova

Zhanyl Baigabylova

Panellists

Panellist Abdiel Kude

Abdiel Kude



Panel 4 | GFP Locally: Community Stakeholders, Local Partner Organisations, Local Registration, and Satellite Offices

One of the unique features of community-based peace building is the fact that such peace-building efforts draw resources – including time, finances, and skills – from the community, in an attempt to create peaceful outcomes within the community itself. This creates an interesting dynamic for international NGOs, such as Generations For Peace, that aim to encourage community-based peace-building processes in localities around the world.
How can such NGOs balance their international standing and scope with constructive engagement in local communities?

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Panellist Lama Hattab

Lama Hattab

Panellists

Panellist Hana’ Jumah

Hana’ Jumah

Panellists

Panellist Zahid Johnson

Zahid Johnson

Panellists

Panellist Warda Samara

Warda Samara

Panellists

Panellist Paul Wel

Paul Wel



Panel 5 |GFP Volunteers and Volunteerism

“Volunteerism is not something you get; it is first and foremost something that you give. It is the fire that burns inside of you that enables you to change your community” – Tornike Chargeishvili

Generations For Peace prides itself on being volunteerbased organisation; it depends heavily on its local volunteers, referred to as Delegates and Pioneers, to carry out peace-building programmes within their home contexts. Rather than having external experts design and implement programmes, GFP trains local leaders of youth in a unique conflict transformation curriculum such that they can design programmes that address specific conflicts within their communities. However, being an organisation reliant on the quality and commitment of its volunteers, GFP must invest heavily in
volunteer management: in specific, the recruitment, retention and recognition of Delegates and Pioneers. It is these “three R’s of volunteerism” that were the focus of this panel discussion.

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Moderator Safiya Ibn Garba

Safiya Ibn Garba

Panellists

Panellist Tornike Chargeishvili

Tornike Chargeishvili

Panellists

Panellist Malaka Samara

Malaka Samara

Panellists

Panellist Mercia Takavarasha

Mercia Takavarasha

Panellists

Panellist Andrea Thomas

Andrea Thomas



Panel 6 | Demystifying M&E: What Worked and What Not?

This panel dealt with monitoring and evaluation (M&E) in the peace-building sector by zooming in on the model of M&E used by Generations For Peace (GFP).
Participants discussed the importance of M&E procedures, the specificity of GFP’s approach to M&E, and some of the successes and challenges of this approach. The panel concluded with some recommendations for implementing and improving a participatory approach to M&E within the peacebuilding field.

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Moderator Nabila Hussein

Nabila Hussein

Panellists

Panellist Sanja Angelovska

Sanja Angelovska

Panellists

Panellist Tamar Nasidze

Tamar Nasidze

Panellists

Panellist Sairah Yusuf

Sairah Yusuf

Panellists



Panel 7 | Research: What purpose does research serve?

The topic of the final panel at the inaugural Generations For Peace Institute (GFPI) Forum surrounded the question, “What purpose does research serve?” Agreeing on the definition of research to include any gathering of data, information and facts for the advancement of knowledge, the panelists focused on the research done through GFPI in the field of peace building.
GFPI focuses on research as a way of bridging theory and practice; the aim is to invest in research that takes some of the more academic theoretical frameworks in peace building and links them to actual practice on the ground. The purpose of this panel in particular, was to discuss how theory is applied in practice, and to bring together different perspectives on what purpose research may serve to enhance GFP programming.

Panellists

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Panel Summary

Moderator

Panellist Sairah Yusuf

Sairah Yusuf

Panellists

Panellist Abdullahi Benaiah

Abdullahi Benaiah

Panellists

Panellist Paul Wel

Paul Wel

Panellists

Panellist Love Calissendorff

Love Calissendorff

Panellists

Moderator Nabila Hussein

Nabila Hussein



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